Join Vectors Using Layers – Part 11 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

Part 11 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the eleventh video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this 11th video of the series, we’ll update an older video of mine – using layers to help join open vectors in the Vectric software. I’ll show you how to copy vectors to a new layer, use those layers to trim vectors one way, then another way, to wind up with 2 layers of closed vectors that are ready to toolpath and preview. Along the way, I’ll show you the Layer Manager, how to turn layers on and off, and how to activate each layer so that you’re editing the right vectors.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough out of me. Below is a link to the 11th video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.511 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Please follow and like us:

Backing Up and Merging the Tool Database – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner – Part 10

Part 10 Website Thumb

This article accompanies the tenth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this tenth video of the series, we’ll go over how to merge the Tool Database of an older version of the Vectric software with the database of a newer version. I’ll show you how to find the database file in the old version, then merge it with your new version. Along the way, I’ll show you how to backup your tool database for safe keeping, or to merge with an installation on a second computer.

 



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the tenth video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.511 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Please follow and like us:

The Tool Database

Part 9 Website Thumbnail
The Tool Database Part 9 – Vectric Software for the Absolute Beginner

 

This article accompanies the ninth video in a series on my YouTube channel. If you’re not subscribed to my channel, here’s a link. Come on by and check it out. Hopefully you’ll find something you like. Read More

While this series might seem like going back to the basics to the seasoned veteran, people who are new to CNC and woodworking in general, and CAD/CAM software in specific, are joining Facebook groups and message forums every day. I frequent a lot of those forums, administrate a few Facebook groups, and am a member of several others. As a result, I’m seeing a lot of posts from beginners who have never done anything in CAD/CAM software, asking questions on some of the very basic tasks involved in using CAD/CAM software.

In this ninth video of the series, we’ll go over how to add new bits and tools to the Tool Database. I’ll demonstrate 3 different ways to add a tool, and give you links to a couple of resources that will help you out, big-time. Along the way, I’ll wade into controversial waters by showing you how I determine my default feeds and speeds.



For the seasoned veteran

I would ask that you please remember that none of us were born with this info. We didn’t just magically start knowing this stuff. Every one of us had to learn it. So if something seems like it should be common sense to you, remember that the person who taught you thought the same thing.

Also remember that none of us have the same equipment. You may have or have access to a CNC that’s capable of operating way outside the parameters I mention in the video. I ask that you please remember that not everyone does. This series is dedicated to the home hobby CNC beginner who may own a Stepcraft, Shapeoko, or X-Carve CNC, and wants to learn how to use it. You may disagree with some of the numbers I present, but please keep in mind that some of these smaller machines aren’t as rigid as the bigger, more robust machines.

Also, you probably don’t need a lot of the info contained in this video, or even in this series. But if you decide to check it out, hopefully you’ll pick up a tip or pointer here or there, or at least get some insight into what the absolute beginner wants to learn. Maybe you could start sharing your expertise with others as well. This hobby can never have too many teachers.

For the absolute CNC beginner

Don’t stress over any of this. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You CAN learn this. You CAN do this. It’s not always super easy, but it’s never really super difficult, either. Just like anything else you want to do, there is no replacement for experience – and the only way to get that experience is to practice. Get into your CAD/CAM software, and learn it. Draw in it. Calculate toolpaths. Generate g-code. You don’t’ have to cut anything with it – it’s more important that you learn how to use the software than it is to start making chips.

That’s enough jabbering from me. Below is a link to the ninth video in the series that’s geared toward the absolute Vectric software beginner.

I use VCarve Pro version 9.510 in this video, but all of the information in the video applies to Cut 2D, VCarve, and Aspire software – both the Desktop and the Pro versions.

As usual, if you have any questions, comments, or concerns, please feel free to comment! If you don’t wish to make a public comment, click this Contact Us link, and submit it to me privately. I read ALL of the messages I get through my website, and I answer as many as humanly possible – unless you’re a spambot. Spambots get blocked – so there.

Remember, beginners – relax, take your time, and enjoy the process. It’s supposed to be fun, remember? You can do this. I’m living proof.

This is not an endorsement, paid or otherwise, of VCarve Pro, Vectric Ltd, or any other software or company. It’s just a demonstration of how I work. For more information on, or to download a free trial of VCarve Pro, visit the Vectric website at:

http://www.vectric.com/

Remember to click that link up at the top of the page to check out my T-Shirt shop!

Until next time, take care and have fun!

Please follow and like us: